List of Document and Digital Sources I deposited at the Nanwalek Library and Museum

During the past years, I worked on different projects in collaboration with community members in Nanwalek as well as with the Nanwalek IRA Council. One type of research I did for collecting information on the history of the lower Kenai Peninsula region is looking at archives and archival sources. I visited some of the archives in person and I also reviewed material and finding aids online. Whenever I found something relevant such as photos, recordings, documents, microfilms, publications, etc that pertained to the history of Nanwalek, the surrounding area, community members and their ancestors, I requested permission and placed additional  copies into the Nanwalek Library and the Museum for everyone for use.

These collections are available for checkout and anybody from the community can look at them and use them. Through various projects, that were generously funded by the National Science Foundation and the Alaska Humanities Forum, I also digitized all of the old audio tapes that were deteriorating. Now the digital versions are available for people to check out from the library, listen to them in MP3 formats, and download them to their computers. Most recently, first Wally Kvasnikoff and then Emilie Swenning, started to transcribe and translate some of these digitized stories, and as part of our collaboration, we also completed a small pilot-program to digitize old newspaper clippings, photos, and documents in the collection of the Nanwalek Museum.

As many of you have expressed interest in reviewing and working with these sources, I believe a list of the sources I deposited at the Nanwalek Library would be helpful. I also deposited copies of all publication I so far produced from data collected and documented as part of this collaboration, so I listed those as well.

Please keep in mind: All documents are included with permission from the holding institution or available to the public – they cannot be reproduced for profit.  In general, documents can be used for personal research and educations purposes, but please contact the holding institution to ascertain reproduction and use limitations.

This collection is intended for reference purposes – please see the digital files for additional details and/or documents.

List of Documents and Digital Sources

(This is not a complete list of all the resources available at the Nanwalek Library. The following are those that I have located during my research, edited, digitized, or authored and deposited in the library.)

  1. A Collection of Documents Pertaining to the Sugpiaq Ethnohistory of the Lower Kenai Peninsula of Alaska – These are organized into three ring binders with archival folders and placed in a black banker type archival box.

Coal Village

Saints Sergius and Herman of Valaam Church

  • Johnson, Lora L.

1996    Exxon Valdez Oil Spill Restoration Project Final Report. Anchorage: Chugach Development Corporation.

Introduction – Part I pp.1-13

Nanwalek, Port Graham – Part I pp. 27-30.

– Sergius and Herman Russian Orthodox Churches, Old Church English Bay, Kenai Peninsula Borough, Alaska

– Kenai Peninsula Borough AK Archives Cemetery – Saints Sergius and Herman of Valaam Russian Orthodox Cemetery in Nanwalek, Alaska.

Not included in this collection, but also available online:

Kenai Peninsula Borough AK Archives Cemetery – Port Graham Cemetery in Port Graham, Alaska. The Kenai Totem Tracers Genealogy Society. Online Source:

  • Stanek, Ronald. Chapter V: Nanwalek Pp. 83-107.
  • Russian Orthodox Greek Catholic Church of America, Diocese of Alaska Records Manuscript Division, Library of Congress

Finding Aid is available – compiled by Antoinette Shalkop

“Collection Summary. Title: Russian Orthodox Greek Catholic Church of America, Diocese of Alaska Records. Span Dates: 1733-1938.  ID No.: MSS38695

Creator: Russian Orthodox Greek Catholic Church of America. Diocese of Alaska Extent: 87,000 items; 748 containers plus 23 oversize; 326 linear feet; 402 microfilm reels.

Language: Collection material in Russian, with English, French, and Ukrainian. Repository: Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Abstract: Principally ecclesiastical records relating to the administration of the numerous parishes and chapels of the Russian Orthodox Church in Alaska.”

Online Access to Finding Aid

Included in this collection in the following order:

Selections from Microfilm reel 202 (Box D301) – IN RUSSIAN:

– Aleksandrovsk. Buildings–property. Munin, Ioann, house donation, 1898. Education–school records, 1898-1900 (entire school journal)

– English Bay. Inventories. Sts. Sergius and Herman Church, 1880.

– Gornaia Ekspeditsiia. Buildings–property. Chapel, 1860-1861. Financial reports. Cash, candles, and supplies, 1861-1865. Income and expenses, 1861-1863

  • Alaska State Library Historical Collections

Michael Z. Vinokouroff papers, 1764-1984.

Finding Aid is available: Guide to the Vinokouroff Collection

Selections from collection MS081 in the following order – IN RUSSIAN and/or IN ENGLISH:

  • asl_ms081_022_44

Box 22 Administrative records (instructions, records, inventories, and registers, Eastern Siberia and North America, 1764-1972)

Parish records (1810-1915 and n.d.). Alphabetical by parish.

Folder 44.  Kenai Mission.  Accounts. 1860-1867. Eight documents: expenditures, income, disbursements, and receipts.

  • asl_ms081_022_45

Box 22  Administrative records (instructions, records, inventories, and registers, Eastern Siberia and North America, 1764-1972)

Parish records (1810-1915 and n.d.). Alphabetical by parish.

Folder 45.   Kenai Mission.  Hegumen Nikolai (2 documents). 1867. Certified copy of last will and testament, 13 Feb. 1867.  Report serving as cover letter for testament and for writings (Box 23, Folder 20).

  • asl_ms081_022_46

Box 22   Administrative records (instructions, records, inventories, and registers, Eastern Siberia and North America, 1764-1972)

Parish records (1810-1915 and n.d.). Alphabetical by parish.

Folder 46.   Kenai Mission. 16 documents. 1849-1867 and n.d. Includes reports and letters from Hieromonk Nikolai to Bishop Innokentii and others.  Report by subdeacon Makarii Ivanov of the Kenai Mission, 10 August 1867, on the last illness and death of Hegumen Nikolai.

  • asl_ms081_023_09

Box 23     Administrative records (clergy, educational activities), clergy writings, diocesan and parish publications, and miscellaneous (Eastern Siberia and North America, 1842-1922 and n.d.)

Clergy correspondence

Folder 9.     Russian Orthodox Church. Alaska Bishopric. Clergy Service Records. Kenai Church of the Dormition of the All-Holy Theotokos 1907.

  1. Priest Pavel Shadura
  2. Reader Aleksandr Demidov
  3. Acting Reader and School Teacher Nikolai Ivanovich Munin
  4. Reader and Parish School teacher Nikolai Romanovich Fomin
  5. Interpeter Filipovich Panfilov
  • asl_ms081_023_46

Box 23     Administrative records (clergy, educational activities), clergy writings, diocesan and parish publications, and miscellaneous (Eastern Siberia and North America, 1842-1922 and n.d.)

Clergy correspondence

Folder 46.        Reader Ivan I. Kvasnikov (Kenai, AK) to Hegumen Victor. 22 Dec. 1914.

  • asl_ms081_023_47

Box 23     Administrative records (clergy, educational activities), clergy writings, diocesan and parish publications, and miscellaneous (Eastern Siberia and North America, 1842-1922 and n.d.)

Clergy correspondence

Folder 47.        Ivan Efimovich Munin to an unnamed ecclesiastical superior. 1892. Describes founding of Chapel of St. Sergius and St. Herman following Russian withdrawal of 1867.

  • asl_ms081_024_30

Box 24   Clergy correspondence, 1922-1980s. Letters received (Folders 1-44). Moonin, Nicholas E.          English Bay, AK         1940

  • asl_ms081_024_35

Box 24  Clergy correspondence, 1922-1980s. Letters received (Folders 1-44). Shadura, Pavel A.  Kenai, AK       1940-1941       3 letters.

  • asl_ms081_024_66

Box 24   Clergy correspondence, 1922-1980s

Letters received (Folders 45-71)

Shadura, Pavel A.  Kenai, AK       1924

  • Alaska Commercial Company Records

University of Alaska Fairbanks

Alaska and Polar Regions Collections

Elmer E. Rasmuson Library USUAF3

In English

Online Access to Finding Aid

  • Alaska Commercial Company Records. Box 8, Folder 91, 92, 93, 96, 98, 99, 100, 101, 102, 104. Archives, Alaska and Polar Regions Collections, Rasmuson Library, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

Alaska Commercial Company Records. Box 9, Folder 105, Archives, Alaska and Polar Regions Collections, Rasmuson Library, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

Complete List of material pertaining to Nanwalek from ACC finding aid: English Bay

  • Box 8, Folder

91 Accounts, Daily Cash Record: Day Book, May 9, 1896 – May 4, 1897

92 Accounts, Demand Payments, 1876-1896

93 Accounts, Discounted Merchandise, 1886-1897

94 Accounts, Individual & Assorted, 1873-1885

95 Accounts, Individual & Assorted, 1886-1896

96 Accounts, Individual & Station: Winter 1891, 1891

97 Accounts, Individual: E. Bay, 1891

98 Accounts, Individual: English Bay, 1891-1892

99 Accounts, Individual: English Bay, 1891-1892

100 Accounts, Individual: English Bay, 1892-1893

101 Accounts, Individual of Mess, Reductions: Mess, 1888-1891

102 Accounts, Inter-Station , 1894-1897

103 Accounts, Invoices of Merchandise Received, 1888

104 Accounts, Outstanding , 1872-1897

  • Box 9, Folder

105 Accounts, Inventory of Buildings and Household Articles, 1872-1879

106 Accounts, Inventory of Merchandise, 1873-1895

107 Accounts, Inventory of Merchandise, 1893-1897

108 Accounts, Inventory of Merchandise, 1889-1897

109 Accounts, Invoices/Inventories Merchandise Received, 1889-1897

110 Accounts, Mess, 1873-1896

111 Accounts, Receipts, 1891-1896

112 Accounts, Requisitions, 1877-1897

  • Box 10, Folder

113 Accounts, Statements of Affairs, 1875-1897

114 Accounts, Station Expenses, 1873-1897

115 Fur Invoices, 1873-1897

116 Letters, Incoming, 1897-1902

117 Log Book: Records English bay Station Commenced, August 1, 1876 – April 6, 1878

118 [Log Book] Commenced April 30, 1879 – May 12, 1882. Note: (Comet sighted August 19, 1881), April 30, 1879 – May 12, 1882

119 [Log Book] Begun May 13, 1882, English Bay a.t. – May 1883, May 13, 1882 – May 1883

120 [Log Book] Commenced May 15, 1883, Engl. Bay. – July 1884, May 15, 1883-July 1884

121 [Log Book] English Bay 1884 – September 1885, 1884-September 1885

122 [Log Book] English Bay Station, 1892 to Nov. 23, 1895, 1892-November 23, 1895

123 [Log Book] Record Book, English Bay Station from November 23, ’95 to October 12, 1898, November 23, 1895-October12, 1898

124 Miscellaneous: Memorandum (Possibly English Bay, no date)

  1. BIA Census, National Archives – at the time of collection, these documents were in the Anchorage repository, which is now disbanded. These documents are in spiral binding.
  • Nanwalek Census 1937
  • Nanwalek Census 1938
  • Nanwalek Census 1941
  • Nanwalek Census 1944
  • Nanwalek Census 1946
  • Nanwalek Census 1958
  • Nanwalek Census 1962
  • Nanwalek Census 1964
  • Portlock Census 1938-1939
  1. Digitized Tapes. Alexandrovsk interviews 1980-1981 – The original audio tapes are in the care of the Nanwalek Library. The digital files are available in a booklet that is in a three ring binder. I attached a Flash Drive with the interviews in an MP3 format to the binder. Those tapes that were copies or commercially produced/copyrighted were not digitized., but all other tapes were. There were a total of 92 items.

Below is the Preface I included with this collection:

The Nanwalek Audio Tape Collection came about through the diligent work of the English Bay School Students attending classes in 1980 and 1981 and the generosity of Nanwalek Elders, culture bearers, and community members, who shared their knowledge of local history and stories that were passed down to them.

By 2012, these cassette tapes the interviews were recorded on were obsolete technologically and, not surprisingly, started to deteriorate. During my stay in Nanwalek as part of the Sugpiaq Ethnohistory Project, I met with Emilie Swenning, as the representative of the local library, to assess the condition of the tapes and find a good archiving approach. While it was clear that we needed to digitize the tapes before they become completely unusable, finding an effective way to do that needed some consideration.

The collection consisted of 92 tapes, and each of them had to be manually played while recording into a digital format. This process required a long term commitment and appropriate equipment. For this reason, we signed an agreement that released the tapes into my care so that I was able to transport them to Dartmouth College for digitization.

I was able to digitize approximately half of the tapes in Hanover, New Hampshire during the year of 2013. I worked on the other half during the spring of 2014 while living in Homer, Alaska. In the end, 16 tapes were not digitized. Some of these were commercially produced recordings, others were copies of tapes with the copyrights residing at various institutions, and again, others were missing or empty. Of the remaining 76 tapes, some were duplicates, and I selected the better of the two available copies to use while recording.

Now that the work is complete, I am returning the tapes back to the care of Emilie Swenning, who is taking them back to the Nanwalek Library, where it will be available for community members.

The information recorded on these tapes, the voices of Elders, some of whom had already passed on, and the stories they learned from their ancestors were once close to being lost. Now that they are available in a digital format, they can be shared with all community members, saved on many computers, burned on CDs, played in smart classrooms, and downloaded on digital music players. The more copies there are of these recordings, the more likely they will survive into the future for the education of Sugpiaq generations to come.

  1. Sugpiaq Ethnohistory Project Recorded Interviews 2012 – These are included on the Flash Drive with the previous interviews. The information is also in the same binder.

List of Files: 

  • Wally and Nina Kvasnikoff – 01-19-12

01-19-12a        Wally and Nina Kvasnikoff

01-19-12b        Wally and Nina Kvasnikoff

  • Kathy Brewster – 02-01-12

02-01-12a        Kathy Brewster

02-01-12b        Kathy Brewster

02-04-12a        Kathy Brewster

02-04-12b        Kathy Brewster

02-04-12c        Kathy Brewster

02-04-12d       Kathy Brewster

02-04-12e        Kathy Brewster

02-04-12f        Kathy Brewster

02-04-12g        Kathy Brewster

02-04-12          Kathy Brewster photos

  • Kathy Brewster, Malania Kehl, and Natalie Kvasnikoff – 02-08-12

02-08-12          Kathy Brewster, Malania Kehl, and Natalie Kvasnikoff

  • Natalie Kvasnikoff – 02-11-12

02-11-12a        Natalie Kvasnikoff

02-11-12b        Natalie Kvasnikoff

02-11-12c        Natalie Kvasnikoff

02-11-12d       Natalie Kvasnikoff

02-11-12          Natalie Kvasnikoff pictures

  • Kathy Brewster and Malania Kehl – 02-23-12

02-23-12a        Kathy Brewster and Malania Kehl

02-23-12b        Kathy Brewster and Malania Kehl

  • Wally and Nina Kvasnikoff – 02-23-12

02-23-12a        Wally and Nina Kvasnikoff

02-23-12b        Wally and Nina Kvasnikoff

  • Alma and Ephim Moonin – 03-17-12

03-17-12          Alma and Ephim Moonin

  • Pauline Demas – 05-08-12

05-08-12a        Pauline Demas

05-08-12b        Pauline Demas

  • Emilie Swenning – 05-09-12

05-09-12a        Emilie Swenning

05-09-12b        Emilie Swenning

05-09-12c        Emilie Swenning

05-09-12d       Emilie Swenning

05-09-12e        Emilie Swenning

  • Emilie Swenning – 05-10-12

05-10-12a        Emilie Swenning

05-10-12b        Emilie Swenning

05-10-12c        Emilie Swenning

05-10-12d       Emilie Swenning

05-10-12a        Rhoda Moonin

05-10-12b        Rhoda Moonin

  • Kathy Brewster – 05-11-12

05-11-12          Kathy Brewster

  • Wally Kvasnikoff and Ephim Moonin – 07-22-12

07-22-12a        Wally Kvasnikoff and Ephim Moonin

07-22-12b        Wally Kvasnikoff and Ephim Moonin

07-22-12c        Wally Kvasnikoff and Ephim Moonin

07-22-12d       Wally Kvasnikoff and Ephim Moonin

07-22-12e        Wally Kvasnikoff and Ephim Moonin

07-22-12f        Wally Kvasnikoff and Ephim Moonin

07-22-12g        Wally Kvasnikoff and Ephim Moonin

07-22-12h        Wally Kvasnikoff and Ephim Moonin

07-22-12i         Wally Kvasnikoff and Ephim Moonin

07-22-12j         Wally Kvasnikoff and Ephim Moonin

07-22-12k        Wally Kvasnikoff and Ephim Moonin

  • Kathy Brewster – 07-22-12

07-22-12a        Kathy Brewster

07-22-12b        Kathy Brewster

07-22-12c        Kathy Brewster

07-22-12d       Kathy Brewster

07-22-12e        Kathy Brewster

07-22-12f        Kathy Brewster

07-22-12g        Kathy Brewster

07-22-12h        Kathy Brewster

07-22-12i         Kathy Brewster

07-24-12a        Kathy Brewster and Malania Kehl

07-24-12b        Kathy Brewster and Malania Kehl

07-24-12c        Kathy Brewster and Malania Kehl

  • Alma and Ephim Moonin – 07-27-12

07-27-12          Ephim and Alma Moonin

  1. Publications

Csoba DeHass, Medeia

2007    Daily Negotiation of Traditions in a Russian Orthodox Sugpiaq Village in Alaska. Ethnology 46(3): pp. 205-216. 2 copies available.

2009    Sugpiaq Russian Orthodoxy – Conceptual Analogy in Religious Syncretism in Nanwalek, Alaska. Unpublished dissertation, University of Alaska Fairbanks. 3 copies available.

2011    Aleut Baseball: Cultural Creation and Innovation through a Sporting Event. Special issue on Creative Technologies. Co-authored with Andreas Droulias, University of Alaska Fairbanks. Études/Inuit/Studies 34(2): pp. 21-37. 2 copies available.

2012    What is in a Name? The Predicament of Ethnonyms in the Sugpiaq-Alutiiq Region of Alaska. Arctic Anthropology 49(1): pp. 3-17. 2 copies available.

2014    Sugpiaq Catalog. Lower Kenai Peninsula Sugpiaq Material Culture and Heritage Preservation Project. A Catalog of Artifacts and Materials From Collections at the Pratt Museum in Homer, Alaska. Pratt Museum. Also available accompanying video recording of Museum-based workshop.

DeHass, David

2014    Honda Country – Relocalization through Technology in Nanwalek, Alaska. Unpublished dissertation, University of Alaska Fairbanks. 1 copy available.

This entry was posted in Alaska Commercial Company Records, Archival Sources and Records, Interviews, Nanwalek Library, Oral History. Bookmark the permalink.

Please add your comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s